Mac and Cheese Recipe

Find an awesome mac and cheese recipe

What makes a mac and cheese recipe out of this world? That's kind of a personal question. For some, for some it's the breadcrumbs on top. For others, it's bits of bacon in the mix. Shaved truffle makes foodies swoon, while lobster speaks to the truly decadent.

Here in Wisconsin, we are all about the cheese half of the equation in a mac and cheese recipe. Some of us are big on mac with asiago and alpine-style cheese, while others get misty for mascarpone and sharp cheddar. Gorgonzola with monterey jack packs a big blue punch, while melty oaxaca cheese with tangy cotija brings a south-of-the-border vibe.

And that's the great thing about mac and cheese recipes – you can always make them your own. And when you make it with Wisconsin cheese, there's no question it'll be the best mac and cheese ever – until your next one.

If you're looking for mac and cheese recipe ideas, go ahead and search our site – we're happy to share. And for tips and inspiration on putting your own stamp on a casserole dish full of creamy, cheesy goodness, read on.

A great mac recipe starts with cheese

A great mac and cheese recipe needs as much cheese as possible, and it needs to be extra gooey and extra melty. Once in a while, you get a cheese like cheddar or emmentaler that can work overtime and check all the boxes. But with a lot of other cheeses, you can add a partner or three for a more complex and eye-popping taste sensation.

In the big flavor category, cheeses like extra sharp cheddar, havarti, smoked gouda, gorgonzola, and pepper jack are great starters. Parmesan is a perennial mac and cheese recipe favorite for the tangy crusty topping it provides. Adding feta can bring a Mediterranean feel and a saltier flavor.

For melters, monterey jack, fontina, baby swiss, and mozzarella are the bread and butter of many a mac and cheese recipe.

But we've mentioned just a handful of the 600 varieties of cheese that come out of Wisconsin each year. It's worth taking almost any cheese for night out next time you're working the magic with your own mac and cheese recipe.

Videos: Discover Your Next Favorite Cheese

FAQs: who invented the first mac and cheese recipe?

Who invented the first mac and cheese recipe?

It's not known who invented mac and cheese, but the recorded first cheese and pasta recipe comes from 14th century Italy, while an 18th-century English cookbook contains the first macaroni and cheese mention.

What makes a good mac and cheese recipe?

In addition to great cheese, a good mac and cheese recipe needs a pasta with enough surface area, nooks and crannies to attract the creamy cheese. Also, be sure to melt the cheese slowly so you don't end up with lumps.

Step #1 in your mac and cheese recipe: say hi to Wisconsin

There's lots of ways to make great mac, but it's safe to say that the best mac and cheese recipe starts with Wisconsin cheese. Why? Because Wisconsin simply makes the tastiest, most award-winning, highest-quality cheese in the universe.

This may surprise you, but many of our cheese varieties have won Best in Class awards at the World Cheese Awards. And we're not just talking Wisconsin originals, but cheeses like gouda and parmesan. Did you hear that? Parmesan, people!

That's what happens when the people of one state all work together to make something happen. It's why 90% of Wisconsin milk goes to make cheese, and why Wisconsin has the only Master Cheesemaker program in the world outside of Switzerland.

So, what you think – should we just go ahead rename the dish "macaroni and Wisconsin cheese?"

Craving award-winning aged cheddar, pining for parmesan, or searching for a new cheese to try? The world’s best cheese is just a click away! Explore our directory of Wisconsin cheesemakers and retailers who offer online cheese shopping and get cheese shipped right to your door. What are you waiting for?

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