How to Cut Cheese Like A Pro
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How to Cut Cheese Like A Pro

Any way you shape it or slice it, Wisconsin Cheese is the tastiest around. Before you plan your next cheese party, check out our handy guide to cheese cutting. With the right tools (and a few tips of the trade), you’ll be a cheese cutting pro in no time.


Any way you shape it or slice it, Wisconsin Cheese is the tastiest around. Knowing how to properly cut cheese can help ensure that everyone at the table gets an equitable, bite-sized nibble. 

WEDGES

The wedge is one of the most iconic shapes in the cheese world.  With a thick base and tapered end, it can be a bit of mystery determining how to best slice  up that little wedge of Wisconsin wonderful. Never fear, we’re here to help

Semi-Soft


Example: Gouda


For a wedge of semi-soft cheese, like gouda, first trim off the wax rind. Cut the wedge in half. Then slice each half into long, thin, triangle-like wedges. Depending on how large the wedge is, you may want to cut each slice in half vertically.

Firm or Semi-Firm


Example: Black Pepper BellaVitano®

For a long, narrow wedge of firm or semi-firm cheese, like BellaVitano®, first cut it in half. Cut the narrow half into long, thin slices. Rotate the thicker half 90˚ and slice into long, thin wedges.

This method is great for serving cheeses that have been rubbed with herbs or other flavorful ingredients so everyone gets a bite of spice. 

Alpine-Style 

Example: Pleasant Ridge Reserve

A wedge of alpine-style cheese or other semi-firm cheeses with a natural rinds, can easily be sliced into thin triangles. It’s perfectly fine to leave the rind on the top edge for serving. With a thicker wedge, slice the triangles vertically into thinner triangles.

Blue Cheese

Example: The Blue Jay

Cut a wedge of blue cheese into individual servings by starting at the center of the narrow end of the wedge and cutting outward in a radial pattern.

BRICKS & BLOCKS

With a little handiwork and the right cutting pattern, these chunks of cheese can be transformed into something far more elegant than a pile of cubes. 

Cheddar


Example: Hook's Five Year Aged Cheddar

Transform a block of cheddar or other semi-firm cheese into pretty triangles in a few easy steps. First, cut the block in half. Slice each half into rectangular pieces about 1/8-inch thick, then cut each rectangular piece diagonally to form two triangles.

THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB


With their strange prongs and shapes, cheese knives can be a bit of a mystery.

Knowing which knife to use, and how to properly use them, however, can up your cheeseboard game and make slicing and serving a breeze.

We couldn’t possibly cover all the cheese knives shapes and varieties, but here’s a crash course on a few of the basics.  

Pronged Cheese Knife

Think of the pronged cheese knife as the little black dress of the cheese knife world – it goes with everything. It’s great for cutting soft cheese like brie, but can also be used for slicing harder cheeses. The pronged tip makings picking up and serving cheese pieces a breeze, so we consider this a must-have tool for any cheeseboard. 

Soft cheese knife

You’ll know this knife is a softy when you see the holes. The soft interior of softer cheeses means they are inclined to stick to a solid knife. To avoid sticking or mutilating the cheese when you cut, reach for something with a very thin, sharp straight blade or a knife with holes. 

Cheese spreader

This one is pretty self-explanatory. Use it to serve soft, spreadable cheeses with ease. 

Cheese plane

This classic slicer is great for shaving off paper-thin portions of cheese for tasting. Works great with semi-soft and semi-hard varieties. 

Chisel Knife

Shaped like a tiny paddle, this knife makes a great addition to any cheeseboard. Reach for it whenever you want to easily serve chunks of hard, crumbly cheeses. 

Parmesan Knife

Despite the name, this knife works wonders in any hard cheese situation. The pointed tip makes it easy to  break off bits and bites.  

Cleaver

Although sometimes referred to as the “cheddar cleaver,” this tool needn’t be reserved for just one variety of cheese. Use it to easily slice up anything from hard to semi-soft cheeses. 

Conclusion

Now that you’ve got the knowledge, show us your slicing skills by making this Spicy Game Day Cheeseboard, this Brunch Berry Cheeseboard or another selection from our collection of over 300 recipes featuring Wisconsin Cheese. Share a photo of your next Wisconsin cheeseboard on Instagram and become part of the largest cheese community in the world. 


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